Secrets of Plastic Debt: Finance Infographic

We came across a very interesting article that shed a lot of much needed light on a very dark section of our wallet, the Plastic Debt! We were stirred up by many of the points and wanted to share some with you in a unique way. Hope you enjoy some of our favourite points!

  • The host of Til Debt Do Us Part, Gail Vaz-Oxlade tells the couples that she counsels to try and live on only cash for one whole month, create a budget and record all purchases.
  • When someone pays with cash, our first thought is “They were not approved for credit.” We couple the fact that someone uses cash to poverty. As if they are scrounging to get enough money together to pay their bills.
  • When someone pays with credit, we assume they have all their financial ducks in a row. When in reality, they either are well educated on how to use credit properly, or they are driving themselves further into debt.
  • Now a days, our issue is that most of us don’t really know what our income is. Our credit gives us the illusion of a bloated income, although reality is we are sinking in debt.
  • In order to put together a manageable and accurate budget, it’s necessary to do a spending analysis. In order to complete this analysis and come up with an honest review, you will need to consult both your credit and banking statements to get a full picture of your spending. For instance, your actual grocery list might average a total of $200 a week, but you are spending additional funds on lunches while you’re out and a coffee every day on your way to work. By examining every spending habit, your able to give yourself a better idea as to how much you are spending and where is feasible to cut your spending if needed.
  • Many financial experts say the best way to tackle a manageable budget is to seriously consider your needs vs. your wants, and to continually pay off as much debt as possible. These experts include Ms. Vaz-Oxlade of Til Debt Do Us Part, Don Allen, trustee and owner of Don Allen & Associates, and Jeffery Schwartz, executive director of Consolidated Credit Counseling Services of Canada Inc.
  • Ms. Vaz Oxlade separates these into three categories, one being your “essentials needs”: debt repayment, savings, rent, transportation etc. The second being “nice to have needs” : clothing, addition food allowance. All extras fall into the third category. Although your income may be minimal or inconsistent, it is best to plan each budget a month in advance, to guarantee that  this month’s income will cover next month’s budget needs.
  • We know what you’re thinking, what about all those unexpected expenses that bust our budgets out of the water. It’s best to setup a fund for these expenses. This way when you need that new set of glasses, or a new part for your car, you can refer back to this fund. It may take awhile to build up this fund, but deposit whatever you can into it, whenever you can. Every penny adds up and every dollar counts. A good way to keep up with this, is to give yourself a challenge. Add a dollar every day to your emergency jar, or every time you come home, empty your pockets into the jar. Remember, this is your EMERGENCY fund, not your chocolate emergency fund.